Mar 192018
 

So I have a friend, an amazing fellow from my Zombie Tag days, who has written a book, The Shaper’s Timepiece. A scifi super hero book that is quite interesting from what I’ve read of it. As he was promoting it before he launched his KickStarter I jokingly asked if root beer made an appearance in the book. He, quite surprised, responded that it did. Well, I can always get behind root beer in pop culture. How else will our beloved beverage continue to spread? If science fiction, super hero books that mention root beer occasionally are your thing, check it out and give your support if you feel so inclined.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/wmwassmann/the-shapers-timepiece-by-wm-wassmann




Aug 312017
 

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THE BETTER BEER BOOK IS THE FIRST EVER AMERICAN BOARD BOOK ON BEERS & COVERS AN IN DEPTH ANALYSIS OF PREMIUM BEERS AVAILABLE IN THE USA!

Yes, I know it’s not a root beer board book, but I’ve found if beer things find success, then similar root beer things often follow, being made in breweries and all. So some guys have got a KickStarter going and if you are interested in beer things, check out their press release below and maybe check their KickStarter.

Orlando, FL, USA – August 19, 2017: The Better Beer Book is the first ever board book on beers and the creators of this remarkable board book are now seeking community support on the crowdfunding platform of Kickstarter to raise funds for this book. The board book is the ultimate guide for the beer lovers around the world and particularly in the United States and it has everything a beer enthusiasts needs to know.

“This board book is a much have guide for every beer enthusiast in America and we have created it in a shape of a beer can to inspire the love of beer in its readers.” Said Jeffery, the author The Better Beer Book. “This book has everything a beer lover needs to learn from the countdown of the top premium beer in the USA to several types of popular beer.” He added.

In addition, The Better Beer Book has 60 pages of content on beers and it is equipped with sliders with hidden inquiries. Moreover, it also has an authentic beer glossary along with the essence of beer, beer production and distribution of beers. The creator of this project has also announced that all those supporting the crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter will not only get this book as a reward for their pledge but will also get their name in the board book.

For more information and to support this project on Kickstarter, please visit the link below:

www.kickstarter.com/projects/408116616/1418692473?ref=329653&token=1e9a95ec

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May 222016
 

Some Old Brews Sometimes we wish we could go back and capture an opportunity that we’ve missed. Sometimes those opportunities are root beers that we wished we’d bought when we saw them on sale. Sometimes, years later, we find those vintage bottles and wonder, could this really be a second chance? Often I’ve had those thoughts, yet I’ve never bought those old bottles that you see sometimes on Ebay and the like, figuring that they’d be long past the date where they’d taste remotely like they originally did. But a month ago someone posted on a Facebook group that he had a bunch of root beers, only 10 years old. I spied some that I’d missed, Hires, Journey Great Northern, and Sonora. He said they were only $10. Which sounded like quite the deal. With shipping it should only be around $20 which isn’t too much to risk unreviewably old brews. Maybe one or more would still be good. I told him that I’d buy them. After some back and forth about Payment the final total came to $40, which I wasn’t very pleased about. I mean, I know you can ship flat rate USPS for only $12, so his initial $10 had ballooned into $28 which is way more than I wanted to pay for such a thing, but I figured I’d go through with it anyways.

The first one I tried was the Journey. Journey brews have always been horrible, so maybe the horribleness of being really old would be indistinguishable from it’s original flavor and I could get a review from it. The first thing I noticed was that there was no carbonation left. It didn’t smell like root beer either. It tasted fruity and syrupy and utterly unlike root beer. The flavor can best be described as when you get a snow cone with every flavor of syrup, let it melt, and then drink the results. Not good at all, and clearly not what it originally tasted like. It wasn’t reviewable. What a disappointment. I pressed on though, and tried Hires, with similar results. Oh well.

Sonora seemed like it wasn’t quite as old. There was still some carbonation and a hint of vanilla amongst the snow cone syrup flavor. Still way gross and still not root beer. I’d like to say it was a waste, but it wasn’t, it was very informative. Now I wonder what some of those vintage bottles from the ’60’s taste like, snow cone syrup, or something different all together. Is it the fate of all old root beers to eventually degrade to the same strange state? At what age to they stop changing? I intend to find out, but not immediately, I’ve got real root beers to drink. But fear not, I’ll get to the bottom of this, for science, and for the love of root beer.